Gourmet-Cooking-Techniques-applied-to-ce
Real-Living.png

Cut to the Facts

Salmon
Pumpkin-Hummus-3-lighter.jpg
Image by Inha Pauliuchenka
Food is Medicine. Create Your  Prescription.
Blueberries
Green Vegetables

Nutrition Prescription

  • EAT A PLANT-FORWARD DIET INCLUDING A VARIETY OF SOURCES

  • PRIORITIZE WHOLE GRAINS

  • DRINK AT LEAST 8 CUPS OF WATER PER DAY

  • FOCUS ON HEALTHY, UNSATURATED FATS

  • STAY ACTIVE! AIM FOR 150 MINUTES PER WEEK

  • LIMIT HIGHLY PROCESSED FOODS

Chicken Garbanzo Dinner.jpg
Carbohydrate foods.jpg
Healthy Fats.jpg

Macronutrient Breakdown

Protein

Protein is essential to organs, muscles, tissues, bones, skin and hair but instead of going for as MUCH protein as possible, go for the highest quality possible and focus on variety. Try wild-caught salmon, organic chicken, grass-fed beef, free-range eggs, lentils, organic soy.  

Carbohydrate​

Carbs are not the enemy. Unprocessed, fiber-rich carbohydrates can fuel your body, reduce cravings and keep you thinking clearly all day. Choose a variety of fruit, whole grains, beans, and starchy vegetables throughout the day to keep you alert and energized. 

Fat​

The "no-fat" days of the 90's are gone. Choose healthy fats in small portions to help you stay full, absorb vitamin D and keep hormones balanced. Olive oil, nuts, seeds and avocado are great choices. Aim for 1-3 TBSP servings, depending on your energy needs.

Berries

Facts on Fruit

Fruit is a healthy, high-fiber choice. Some avoid it "because of the sugar content." Stick to 1/2 cup fresh fruit servings and pair your fruit with a healthy fat or quality protein. Try an apple with peanut butter, or a clementine orange with a small handful of almonds. 

hand serving size visual.png

It's in Your Hands

All foods fit in a healthy diet, in moderation.  Portion management is key to ensure you're meeting your nutrient needs.

Give yourself a hand -- literally! While a food scale, measuring cups, and measuring spoons will give you the most accurate info, sometimes an in-the-moment shortcut can help.

AdobeStock_updated.jpeg

REAL Challenge

Read the nutrition labels FULLY to choose the more nutrient-dense option.

A study found that consumers tend to read only the first five components (servings, calories, total fat, saturated fat and trans fat) of the Nutrition Facts label. To identify nutrient-dense foods we need to be sure to read further down the label to the other beneficial nutrients such as calcium, potassium and fiber.

 

Here's a simple example: You're deciding between two packages of bread. The first option has about 80 calories per slice, but few vitamins and minerals. The second option has about the same number of calories, but more protein, three times the magnesium, and more than double the fiber, potassium, vitamin B6 and zinc.

 

So, which option is more nutrient-dense? The whole-grain.